Amos/4h Brooks

M, #29674, (circa 1753 - 27 May 1822)
Father*Jabez/3h Brooks1 b. 11 Jun 1714
Mother*Eunice (–?–)1
Appears on charts:Descendants of Thomas/1h Brooks
Descendants of Dea. Thomas/2h Brooks
Descendants of Jabez/3h Brooks
Last Edited:29 Jul 2017

Children with Elizabeth Spencer:

  • Sylvester/5h Brooks1,5 b. circa 1787, d. 21 Mar 1859
  • Deming/5h Brooks5 b. circa 1793, d. 23 Jul 1854
Findagrave.com, memorial #35789213. Photo by John Beckstein.
Amos/4h Brooks, born circa 1753 (g.s.)2, married, 4 Sep 1784 at Haddam, Connecticut, Elizabeth Spencer.1,3 The 1790 census enumerated their Haddam household as Amos, two males under 16, and three females.4 Amos and his brother Jabez are said to have "built the [Abial] Brooks place."5
     Amos Brooks died 27 May 1822 (g.s.), a. 692, and his widow 26 Apr 1846.6 They are buried in Old Rock Landing Cemetery, Haddam Neck.3

Census Detail:

1790Haddam, CTMALES: One 16+
Two under 16
FEMALES: Three4

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S629] David V. Hoffman, personal pedigree file.
  2. [S148] Findagrave.com, memorial #35789213.
  3. [S148] Findagrave.com, memorials #35789213, #35789710.
  4. [S1790] 1790 U.S. Census, Haddam, Middlesex, CT, M637/1/438, Amos Brooks.
  5. [S643] Unknown author, "Brooks Genealogy" (handwritten family record of Thomas Brooks of Haddam and descendants), Glastonbury (CT) Historical Society. Hereinafter Haddam Brooks Genealogy.
  6. [S148] Findagrave.com, memorial #35789710.

Jacob/4h Brooks

M, #29675, (30 October 1748 - 16 December 1788)
Father*Jabez/3h Brooks1 b. 11 Jun 1714
Mother*Eunice (–?–)1
Appears on charts:Descendants of Thomas/1h Brooks
Descendants of Dea. Thomas/2h Brooks
Descendants of Jabez/3h Brooks
Last Edited:14 Jan 2016

Child with Lydia Bowers:

  • Alfred/5h Brooks1,3 b. say 1778
Jacob/4h Brooks, baptised 30 Oct 17481, married Lydia Bowers1, and died 16 Dec 1788, a. 40.2

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S629] David V. Hoffman, personal pedigree file.
  2. [S629] David Hoffman, citing family history file of Lillian Antoinette Kruger Brooks, Town Hall, Haddam.
  3. [S643] Unknown author, "Brooks Genealogy" (handwritten family record of Thomas Brooks of Haddam and descendants), Glastonbury (CT) Historical Society. Hereinafter Haddam Brooks Genealogy.
A Revolutionary captain, "He commanded the privateer Harlequin, and went on many sea voyages, and was beloved by his men, who always fared as well as he did. He was a pleasant and genial man in peace, but in war a strong and determined fighter."1

Capt. Samuel/4h Brooks

M, #29676, (20 January 1745 - )
Father*Jabez/3h Brooks1 b. 11 Jun 1714
Mother*Eunice (–?–)1
Appears on charts:Descendants of Thomas/1h Brooks
Descendants of Dea. Thomas/2h Brooks
Descendants of Jabez/3h Brooks
Descendants of Capt. Samuel/4h Brooks
Last Edited:21 Aug 2017

Children with Rachel Brainerd:

  • ch1/5h Brooks2 b. circa 1769, d. 22 Mar 1775
  • ch2/5h Brooks2 b. circa 1770, d. 13 Nov 1773
  • Joseph/5h Brooks2 b. say 1772
  • ch3/5h Brooks2 b. circa Apr 1776, d. 22 Mar 1777
  • Olive/5h Brooks2,6 b. 30 Jul 1780
  • ch4/5w Brooks2 b. 30 Jul 1780
  • Samuel/5h Brooks2 b. 30 Jul 1780
  • Mercy/5h Brooks2 b. 30 Jul 1780
  • Jesse/5h Brooks2 b. 30 Jul 1780
  • Lydia/5h Brooks2 b. 30 Jul 1780
  • Sarah/5h Brooks2 b. 26 Aug 1781
  • Chauncey/5h Brooks2 b. 26 Aug 1781
  • Asa/5h Brooks2 b. 13 Jun 1783

Child with Jemima/5 Stocking:

  • Jemima/5h Brooks2 b. say 1788
Capt. Samuel/4h Brooks, born 20 Jan 1745 on Haddam Neck, Haddam, Connecticut1, married (1) Rachel Brainerd, daughter of Abijah Brainerd and Thankful Fuller.2,3 Probably the "Samuel Brooks Jr." (to distinguish him from his cousin and contemporary of the same name, who was 15 years older and also a Haddam resident) who married, circa 1787, Jemima/5 Stocking, daughter of Nathaniel/4 Stocking and Abigail/4 Cooper, and widow of his brother David.4,5
     A Revolutionary captain, "He commanded the privateer Harlequin, and went on many sea voyages, and was beloved by his men, who always fared as well as he did. He was a pleasant and genial man in peace, but in war a strong and determined fighter."1
     
Aside from the regular sea voyages of the privateers, there were suddenly planned and executed, sortie-like adventures along the coast; prominent among which were several to Long Island for the capture of goods stored by the enemy, or persons high in rank for exchange; and, also, in watching the approach of the enemy's ships into the Sound, by the eastern route, with the intention of capturing such as they could. Among the latter was the affair off Point Judith, in the State of Rhode Island, and near the Connecticut line, not heretofore in print, and in which many of the men of Middle Haddam Society were engaged. They organized into six boat crews, consisting of from eight to ten men each. The boats were of the whale boat pattern, the stern constructed like the bow. A swivel was mounted in the bow of each and the crews were properly officered.
     Among the several boat commanders, were: Capt. Samuel Brooks, of Haddam Neck; Capts. Joshua Griffith, Seth Doane, and Abner Stocking, of the Chatham part of the society; and Capt. Sage, of Middletown. Arriving at Point Judith they hauled up their boats in a sheltered bay near by, where they encamped. A constant watch was kept from an eminence for the approach of the enemy's ships. One morning soon after their arrival, the camp was excited over the news of a strange sail seen in the offing, whose appearance was soon generally discussed. The rigging, some said, was like a man-of-war, others that her hull was like a merchantman. The conclusion being in favor of the latter, and to risk an attack, they were soon ready. As the ship drew near the boats put out from around the Point, advanced in succession to the rear, and fired their swivels in rapid rotation into the stern of the supposed merchantman, and retired to load and again take their turns in the attack. When the last had fired the ship bore around, raised a tarpauling covering from her sides, and greatly to their surprise disclosed a man-of-war with two rows of port-holes from which issued a broadside, harmless in effect, as the sea was high and they were so near the balls passed over their heads.
     The attacking boats hastily withdrew, passed around the Point into the bay and out of range with such speed that the boat commanded by Captain Brooks on striking the shore ended over and permanently lamed Elijah Abell, one of its crew, and brother of Abel Abell, who built Abell's mill in Chatham. The other boats, coming in on top of a wave, were landed high on the shore. Unsatisfied, they mounted two of the swivels on the rocks and replied with vigor to the continued broadsides of the enemy. An artillery company happening in the neighborhood and, hearing the melee, hastened down and took a part in the engagement until the ship proceeded on her way. Although no prize was taken, no lives were lost. A prisoner on board of the ship at the time told them, after his release, that a ball from one of the boats passed through a closet in the captain's cabin and broke every dish there, and another ball struck the mizzen mast and passed half through it; that the captain was highly enraged, and said: 'It was the most audacious proceeding he ever heard of, and if he could catch those fellows he would hang every one of them from his yardarm.'
     Timothy Clark, who had some position on the Samson, was severely wounded in an engagement, and taken to the hospital at New London, for treatment, just before the attack on that place by the British. His father Jonathan on learning of his condition, hastened with Capt. Samuel Brooks, down the river in a whale boat to bring him home. Arriving at New London, Col. Ledyard, the commander of Fort Griswold, urged them to remain and assist in the defense of the fort, as he had not men enough—to which they consented, as soon as they had taken their wounded charge to a place of safety. They placed him on a litter, carried him to their boat, and rowed up the river several miles and left him with a Mr. Avery, where they armed and returned.
     As they neared the fort, they climbed a tree to learn the condition there, and saw the British flag waving over it; there they remained until they saw the enemy leaving the fort for their shipping. Then they hastened onward and assisted in caring for their wounded, and burying the dead of the inhumanly massacred garrison. They then returned to their wounded charge and conveyed him home, where he finally died of his wounds.
     The privateer Harlequin, commanded by Capt. Samuel Brooks, of the Neck, and built later than the Samson, was also a high reputation and several prizes. Master Gunner Samuel B.P. Arnold, served successively on board of both vessels. While in this service he was severely wounded by copper shot fired by the enemy. On one occasion, when pursued by a ship of superior force, which carried more canvas than the Harlequin, the prospect of her capture was evidently only a question of time, unless stratagem prevented. Night was fast approaching, as the distance between pursuer and pursued constantly lessened. In the meantime Captain Brooks had ordered an empty cask from the hold, which was then sawed in two, and a whip rigged across the bilge, supporting a mast in the center, all to the perplexity of the wondering crew. When it became sufficiently dark, a light was fastened to the mast of the tub, and it was lowered into the sea and cast adrift. Every light on the Harlequin was suddenly extinguished as she tacked on a new course. Not long after they heard with satisfaction the guns of the enemy firing at the decoy tub. This incidence, often related with great gusto by the master gunner, has since been used by the story writer in tales of sea prowess. It is related of Captain Brooks that while in a certain port with the Harlequin, another American vessel arrived and reported having seen two British vessels headed apparently for another port. Upon being asked why he did not attack them, the Captain replied: 'That he was glad to escape, for either of them were larger and carried more guns than he did.' Captain Brooks sailed immediately for that port, and found the two vessels there, anchored side by side, a little distance apart, either of whom carried more guns than the Harlequin. With an audacity worthy of the celebrated Paul Jones, he ran his vessel between them, and opened rapid fire on each. They, fearful of injuring each other, replied with little effect, and he soon captured both.1

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S729] Henry M. Selden, History of Middlesex County, "The Revolutionary War."
  2. [S629] David V. Hoffman, personal pedigree file.
  3. [S643] Unknown author, "Brooks Genealogy" (handwritten family record of Thomas Brooks of Haddam and descendants), Glastonbury (CT) Historical Society. Hereinafter Haddam Brooks Genealogy.
  4. [S629] David Hoffman, personal pedigree file: 4 Jul 1787, Haddam.
  5. [S728] Becky Kraussmann, citing church records index, CSL: betw Aug 1775-8, undated church record.
  6. [S729] Henry M. Selden, History of Middlesex County, "War of 1812."

Abigail/4h Brooks

F, #29678, (31 October 1756 - )
Father*Jabez/3h Brooks1 b. 11 Jun 1714
Mother*Eunice (–?–)1
Appears on charts:Descendants of Thomas/1h Brooks
Descendants of Dea. Thomas/2h Brooks
Descendants of Jabez/3h Brooks
Last Edited:4 Jan 2016
Abigail/4h Brooks, baptised 31 Oct 17561, married Asaph Young.1

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S629] David V. Hoffman, personal pedigree file.