Phebe/4s Brooks

F, #30374, (12 November 1746 - )
Father*Jonathan/3s Brooks1 b. 17 Nov 1709
Mother*Sarah Hobart1 b. 27 Jul 1725
Appears on charts:Descendants of William/1s Brooks
Descendants of Ebenezer/2s Brooks
Descendants of Jonathan/3s Brooks
Descendants of Phebe/4s Brooks
Last Edited:23 Jan 2016

Children with Samuel Stiles:

  • Abigail/5s Stiles2 b. 4 Dec 1771, d. 14 Sep 1775
  • David/5s Stiles3 b. 11 Apr 1773, d. 17 Jan 1871
  • Timothy/5s Stiles3 b. 23 Feb 1775, d. 29 Apr 1801
  • Ruth/5s Stiles2 b. 19 Jan 1778, d. 15 Sep 1778
  • Ruth Ann/5s Stiles4 b. 1 Jan 1779, d. 3 Oct 1851
  • Benjamin/5s Stiles5 b. 1 Sep 1780, d. 23 Apr 1872
Phebe/4s Brooks, born 12 Nov 1746 at Ridgefield, Connecticut1, married, 18 Feb 1771, Samuel Stiles.2 Of Woodbury, Connecticut2, he died 11 Apr 1819, a. 82.2

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S1461] Jacquelyn Ladd Ricker, The Ricker Compilation, Ridgefield VR, Phebe Brooks b.
  2. [S2167] Henry Reed Stiles, Stiles Family in America, 412, Family 6, Samuel (38.).
  3. [S2167] Stiles Family in America, 412, Family 6, David (40.).
  4. [S2167] Stiles Family in America, 413, Family 6, Ruth Ann (43.).
  5. [S2167] Stiles Family in America, 413, Family 6, Benjamin (44.).

Martha/4s Brooks

F, #30377, (20 February 1752 - )
Father-Candidate*Jonathan/3s Brooks1 b. 17 Nov 1709
Mother-Candidate*Sarah Hobart1 b. 27 Jul 1725
Appears on charts:Descendants of William/1s Brooks
Descendants of Ebenezer/2s Brooks
Descendants of Jonathan/3s Brooks
Last Edited:8 Aug 2014
Martha/4s Brooks was born 20 Feb 1752 at Ridgefield (also rec. Bethlehem), Connecticut.1

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S1461] Jacquelyn Ladd Ricker, The Ricker Compilation, Bethlehem and Ridgefield VR, Martha Brooks b.

Ruth/4s Brooks

F, #30378, (9 November 1753 - )
Father*Jonathan/3s Brooks1 b. 17 Nov 1709
Mother*Sarah Hobart1 b. 27 Jul 1725
Appears on charts:Descendants of William/1s Brooks
Descendants of Ebenezer/2s Brooks
Descendants of Jonathan/3s Brooks
Last Edited:24 Jan 2016
Ruth/4s Brooks, born 9 Nov 1753, probably at Ridgefield, Connecticut,(also rec. Southbury)1, married, 27 Dec 1780 at Southbury, Samuel Munn.2

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S1461] Jacquelyn Ladd Ricker, The Ricker Compilation, Ridgefield and Southbury VR, Ruth Brooks b.
  2. [S1461] Ricker Compilation, Southbury VR, Ruth Brooks/Samuel Munn m.
He removed before the Revolution to Peenbeck, New York, then served a number of enlistments during that conflict in the cause of independence, amounting in all to five years of service.2

Major John/4s Brooks

M, #30379, (4 December 1755 - 22 September 1846)
Father*Jonathan/3s Brooks1 b. 17 Nov 1709
Mother*Sarah Hobart1 b. 27 Jul 1725
Appears on charts:Descendants of William/1s Brooks
Descendants of Ebenezer/2s Brooks
Descendants of Jonathan/3s Brooks
Descendants of Maj. John/4s Brooks
Custom index:Revolutionary War
Last Edited:1 Aug 2017

Children with Rachel Blizzard:

  • Oliver/5s Brooks10 b. 1779
  • George/5s Brooks15 b. 29 Aug 1780, d. before 1850
  • Joseph/5s Brooks10 b. say 1785, d. 1849
  • Sally/5s Brooks16 b. say 1788, d. 1813
  • John/5s Brooks17 b. circa Sep 1791, d. 9 Jul 1842
Findagrave.com, memorial #29579445. Photo by Bobcat25.
Photo by Bobcat25 29579445
Major John/4s Brooks was born 4 Dec 1755 at Ridgefield, Connecticut.1,2 His initial military service in the Revolution, referenced in pension correspondence and erroneously dated 1776 in John's own pension affidavit, was evidently for the term of six months in 1775, under Gen. Richard Montgomery, "at the taking of St. John's, Canada [Fort St. Jean, Quebec]," which fell 2 Nov 1775.2 He married (1), in New York state by 1779, Rachel Blizzard, the mother of his children.3,4,5 He remained at Peenbeck for seven years after the close of the Revolution, during which time his house burned.2 He then spent 10 years in Sullivan County, New York, at least some of these at Neversink, where his house again burned.2 Circa 1800 he removed to Pompey, Onondaga, New York.2
     In 1810 he followed his son John, who had removed the previous year, to Florence, Ohio, where he became a village trustee, 1817.6,2 His wife Rachel died at Florence 23 Mar 1826.4, and he married (2), 7 Jun 1826, Asenath (Mrs. Robey) Smith7, who died at Florence 27 Oct 1827 (g.s.)8 He married (3), 21 Oct 1828, the widow Lena Barnes.9
          "The story of John Brooks's romances is so interesting one [must] pause to contemplate it. A woman named Barnes came to the settlement and lived there four years. Someone coming from the East told her [that] her husband was dead. This did not cause Mrs. Barnes any great grief, because she [had] left him as he was most unkind to her and to their son, whom she brought with her.
     "John Brooks was a charming gentleman, and when he asked the widow Barnes to marry him, she consented. All of the sons of John Brooks liked Mrs. Barnes immensely. Into this happy family came a letter from the East informing them that Mr. Barnes was still alive. The elders of the church called upon Mrs. Barnes and informed her that if she continued to live with Mr. Brooks she would lose her church membership. This seemed to her so serious a matter, that reluctantly she left her happy home, went to church, as was the custom, publicly confessed her fault and asked forgiveness of the congregation. She and her son lived together, but each day she went to Mr. Brooks's house, where she kept things clean, and washed and mended and cooked for the man she still loved.
     "In a short time came word that Mr. Barnes was really dead. The minister then got a marriage license for her and Mr. Brooks and came to the Brooks home. John Brooks was hoeing in the garden and Mrs. Barnes was in the house. The minister told Mr. Brooks that he had come to marry them. Mr. Brooks leaned on his hoe and eyed the minister coldly. 'No sir, Parson,' he told him. 'We're plenty married enough now. I married her once and I meant it. We've neither of us changed. There isn't going to be any more marrying between us.'
     "Probably Mr. Brooks resented the interference of the church in his affairs. However, Reverend Betts was equal to the occasion. He explained to Mr. Brooks how much Mrs. Barnes wanted to keep her church membership, how much it would mean to her, and at last said, 'Now, Mr. Brooks, I know you won't refuse to do a little thing like this, to please your wife.'
     "Mr. Brooks leaned his hoe against the house and went inside. Mrs. Barnes was washing dishes. Mr. Brooks informed her that they were to be married, so she dried her hands, rolled down her sleeves, and they were married by Rev. Xenophon Betts, and lived happily ever after. The whole Brooks family mourned Mrs. Barnes after her death."10
     John Brooks married (4), 5 Feb or 16 Mar 1838, in Huron County, the widow Orrilla (Holcomb) Hancock. "Mr. Brooks was never destined to be as happy again as he had been with [Lena Barnes], for though he married the widow Hancock … for his fourth wife, they did not get along. The records say she was 'bought off, and went to Michigan, and afterwards to Missouri.10'"
     John Brooks died in Erie County, Ohio, 22 Sep 1846, a. 902,11, and is buried in Cable Cemetery, Florence. "Blockhouses and Military Posts of the Firelands [1934] tells us that Cable Cemetery is on Joseph Brooks's lot, and that John, Sr. is buried on John Jr.'s lot with only a DAR marker." However, the recently erected stone seen above stands in Cable Cemetery, inscribed Major Bridges' Mass. Regt. Rev. War 1846. Unfortunately, the units that the Revolutionary veteran of Florence mentioned in his pension application were all from New York — suggesting that the recent benefactor who arranged for the stone confused the Florence man with another John Brooks.12,13
     6 Mar 1833, John Brooks of Florence, Ohio, aged 77, made affidavit at Norwalk concerning his particularly eventful Revolutionary War service. He declared that on 3 Mar 1776, then a resident of Peenbeck, Ulster, New York, he enlisted as a private soldier for one year's service in the company commanded by Capt. Cornelius Hardenburgh in the 3rd NY regiment of the Continental Line. They marched to Esopus, New York, then traveled by water to New York. Wounded at Flatbush, he retreated with the army from Long Island to Manhattan, remaining there until October, when his unit evacuated the island upon the British capture of Fort Washington. They marched to White Plains, where he was wounded in the action of 8 Oct in his right arm, and subsequently furloughed for four weeks, returning to service about 4 Dec 1776. He went with Washington to Trenton, took part in the successful capture of the Hessian garrison there on Christmas Day, and was there dismissed at the expiration of his term of service.
     He further deposed that about the middle of Apr 1777, having returned to Peenbeck, he again enlisted, this time for the term of eight months, as an orderly sergeant in the militia company of Capt. James Tillford, Col. John Snyder's regiment. Stationed at Fort Clinton, about 18 miles below West Point, he was engaged in garrison duty and the construction of fortifications and redoubts at Fort Montgomery. When Fort Clinton fell to the British, he made his escape in the dark, and thence made his way to Newburgh to rejoin his company, continuing in service until his discharge, 7 Dec 1777, having served nine months.
     John Brooks returned to Peenbeck, then enlisted again for frontier service at Fort Dempsey, serving eight months under Capt. Felter on the New York frontier "from Fort Stanwix to Orange County Line." He then joined Sullivan's 1779 expedition against the Iroquois, was engaged in the battle of Beaver Creek against Joseph Brant's force of Mohawks and Loyalists, and there received three different wounds, by Musket Balls Buckshot & Swords. — One of which broke his right thumb which has always since been uselefs to him. In this battle, his regimental lieutenant colonel, major, and company captain (Barzillai Tyler, who had recently appointed John Brooks ensign) were all killed. After the battle Brooks was commissioned lieutenant, which rank he held until the close of the war.
     Discharged in April 1780, he reenlisted (unit unspecified, but probably commanded by Capt. Abraham Cuddebach) and served on garrison duty at DeWitt Fort until the end of the war.2 For disability resulting from his wounds, he was pensioned from January 1, 1777, under the act of June 7, 1785. Under the pension act of 1831, he was awarded a pension, 12 Mar 18--, retroactive to 4 Mar 1831, of $80 annually for Revolutionary service.2
     Christopher Webber writes, "While his service record card and DAR records show him as major, his pension record does not reflect this." See the comment about his burial above for a possible explanation.10
     His widow Orrilla successfully filed application, 4 Jun 1868, for a widow's pension based on his Revolutionary service.2

Sandusky Clarion, 1 Jun 1844
     
A VETERAN WHIG. Among the gallant spirits from Erie County, at the Mass Convention in this city on the 15th inst. was that Whig patriarch, Mr. Brooks. He rode on horseback from his house to Cleveland, 42 miles, and returned on the same faithful animal, in the rain and without an umbrella, though one was offered him, as also a seat in a covered carriage, which he declined. At Dover, he gave a history of his long, eventful and honorable life, as follows:
     He was 88 years old last December, lived in Florence, Erie county, Ohio. That he served under Montgomery before the appointment of Washington as commander-in-chief, and under Washington through the war. Was at the taking of the following places, to wit:  Ticonderoga, Crown Point, Laprarie, Montreal, and was at the siege of St. Johns 23 days; this was in 1775. In 1776 was in the battles of Long Island and White Plains, in both of which actions he was wounded, and the same year in the battle of Trenton, N.J. In 1777, at Montgomery, Monmouth, the Indian battle near Beaver Creek, in which he was wounded in several places. He shot across the river and shot Brant's horse from under him—shot again and wounded him in the knee. Brant was the commander of the Indians. Was at the taking of Stony Point, and in the last action, the taking of Cornwallis.
     In 1781 he received a commission from Congress as commandant of a company, and in 1782, (the war having closed) he received an honorable discharge from Gen. Washington.
     He supported Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, J. Q. Adams, and Harrison, for presidents—has travelled on horse-back to Cleveland, a distance of 42 miles, to attend the convention for the ratification of the nomination of Henry Clay and Theodore Frelinghuysen. That he was a Whig in '76 and ever has been, and ever will be so long as he may live.
| Cleve. Her.14

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S1461] Jacquelyn Ladd Ricker, The Ricker Compilation, Ridgefield VR, John Brooks b.
  2. [S1294] John Brooks, Revolutionary pension file M805/124/W10451.
  3. [S649] Christopher B. Webber, "Descendants of Henry Brooks of Wallingford," citing Cherry, Blockhouses & Military Posts of the Firelands (c. 1934), 42, 62.
  4. [S59] The Sandusky Clarion, 13 May 1826, obituary of Mrs. Rachel Brooks, transcribed by Marianne Rigdon.
  5. [S649] Webber, citing War Dept., Record and Pension Office correspondence, 1928.
  6. [S649] Webber, citing The Firelands Pioneer, v. 3 (Firelands Hist. Soc., Cleveland, c. 1862); Williams, History of the Fire Lands, Comprising Huron and Erie Counties, OH (1879); Cherry, Blockhouses, 41, 61–62; "Article read at Stiles Family Reunion, Wakeman, OH, 12 Aug 1912 by Dr. F.E. Weeks."
  7. [S774] Marianne Rigdon, citing FHL film #0410258; "Early Marriage Records, Huron Co., OH, 1815-1853," John Brooks/widdow Robey Smith m.
  8. [S649] Webber, citing Erie Co., Ohio Cemetery Census before 1909.
  9. [S649] Webber, citing Marriage Records of Huron Co., Ohio, 1815–54; Cherry, Blockhouses, 62.
  10. [S649] Webber.
  11. [S649] Webber, citing DAR Patriot Index (1966); History of the Fire Lands, Comprising Huron and Erie Counties, OH; Erie Co., OH Cemetery Census before 1909; Blockhouses & Military Posts of the Firelands, 42, 62.
  12. [S649] Webber, citing "DAR records of OH."
  13. [S148] Findagrave.com, memorial #29579445.
  14. [S59] Sandusky Clarion (Norwalk, Erie County, OH), 1 Jun 1844: "A Veteran Whig." Transcription: Marianne Rigdon.
  15. [S649] Webber, citing War Dept. Record and Pension Office correspondence, 1928.
  16. [S649] Webber, citing Cherry, Blockhouses & Military Posts of the Firelands (c. 1934), 41, 62.
  17. [S148] Findagrave.com, memorial #34544497.

Rachel Blizzard

F, #30380, (circa 1748 - 23 March 1826)
Appears on charts:Descendants of William/1s Brooks
Descendants of Ebenezer/2s Brooks
Descendants of Jonathan/3s Brooks
Descendants of Maj. John/4s Brooks
Last Edited:28 Jul 2017

Children with Major John/4s Brooks:

  • Oliver/5s Brooks6 b. 1779
  • George/5s Brooks3 b. 29 Aug 1780, d. before 1850
  • Joseph/5s Brooks6 b. say 1785, d. 1849
  • Sally/5s Brooks7 b. say 1788, d. 1813
  • John/5s Brooks8 b. circa Sep 1791, d. 9 Jul 1842
Rachel Blizzard married, as his 1st wife, by 1779 in New York state, Major John/4s Brooks, and bore him all his children.1,2,3 She died 23 Mar 1826 at Florence, Ohio, "in the 79th year of her age."2
     Her obituary, 13 May 1826 in the Sandusky Clarion, reads, Died in Florence, Huron county, on the 23rd day of March last, Mrs. Rachel Brooks, consort of Mr. John Brooks, of said Florence, in the 79th year of her age. She had lived long, a blessing to her friends, and having, on earth, closed her labors of charity and love, she left her friends and relatives with calm resignation, and met death with a firm reliance upon the merits of her Savior.2
     Her husband married thrice more, and died 22 Sep 1846, a. 90.4,5

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S649] Christopher B. Webber, "Descendants of Henry Brooks of Wallingford," citing Cherry, Blockhouses & Military Posts of the Firelands (c. 1934), 42, 62.
  2. [S59] The Sandusky Clarion, 13 May 1826, obituary of Mrs. Rachel Brooks, transcribed by Marianne Rigdon.
  3. [S649] Webber, citing War Dept., Record and Pension Office correspondence, 1928.
  4. [S1294] John Brooks, Revolutionary pension file M805/124/W10451.
  5. [S649] Webber, citing DAR Patriot Index (1966); History of the Fire Lands, Comprising Huron and Erie Counties, OH; Erie Co., OH Cemetery Census before 1909; Blockhouses & Military Posts of the Firelands, 42, 62.
  6. [S649] Webber.
  7. [S649] Webber, citing Cherry, Blockhouses & Military Posts of the Firelands (c. 1934), 41, 62.
  8. [S148] Findagrave.com, memorial #34544497.