During Philip's War (1675-75), Billerica selectmen ordered that "Timothy Brooks is allowed for garrison and to entertain Michael Bacon's family and to have two garrisons of soldiers to defend ye mill and himself ye master of ye garrison." The mill, which Timothy purchased in 1673 of fellow Baptist George Farley of Woburn as part of the Oakes farm, stood at the falls of the Shawsheen River in the east part of what is today Bedford.3,4

Capt. Timothy/2w Brooks

M, #4191, (circa 1635 - before 7 October 1712)
Father*Henry/1w Brooks1 b. c 1592, d. 12 Apr 1683
Mother*(–?–) (–?–)2 d. b 1650
Appears on charts:Descendants of Henry/1w Brooks
Descendants of Timothy/2w Brooks
Y-DNA Overlay Chart -- WOBURN line
Custom index:Baptists of Early Massachusetts & West Jersey
Philip's War (1675-76)
Last Edited:16 Aug 2017

Children with Mary Russell:

Children with Mehitabel/2 Mowry:

Signature of Timothey Broockes, dated 12 Mar 1708. Courtesy Beverly McNally.
Capt. Timothy/2w Brooks was probably born in England circa 1635, based on a 1668 court document in which his age is given as Therti Three.2,3,5 His family was at Concord, in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, by 1639, and relocated to Woburn about 1649.2
     One "Mr Brookes Creditor" entered Harvard College 3 Jun 1651. Sibley suggests that the reference is to Rev. John Brock, H.C. 1646, son of Henry Brock of Dedham, but adds, "In a record of 'The Countrey Stocke' in 1652 is the entry, 'Giuen by goodman brooke of wooborne' 4s. 6d.,—perhaps a relative." If the surname and residence of the 1652 donor are correct, the donor can only be Henry Brooks of Woburn, Timothy's father, or John or Timothy Brooks, Henry's eldest sons. The payment is so modest, however, as to suggest that it reflects a contribution to the college rather than tuition; and no one of the name Brooke(s)/Brooks is known to have attended Harvard this early.6
     Timothy married (1), 2 Dec 1659 at Woburn, Mary Russell, daughter of Dea. John/1 Russell and Elizabeth (–?–), with whom he had 12 children — 3 sons followed by 9 daughters.7,8,9 They lived first at Woburn, where the births of their first 6 children were recorded through 1669. After the death of his brother-in-law Thomas/1 Fox, Timothy also took his nephew Isaac/3w Fox into the Brooks household and raised him.10
     Despite the strong religiosity which was to characterize his later years, Timothy was not without human failings. Middlesex County records tell us, in the words of Roger Thompson, "The recently married Elizabeth Glasier had been importuned by Timothy Brooks 'unto wanton dalliance' for a month in the summer of 1662 and had finally been lured into a room, 'but this examinant denies hee had the use of her but only attempted it and had loosed his breeches with examinant resisting what she could.'… she had failed to tell her husband about the incident with Brooks for two weeks because 'she feared his displeasure.' The court seems to have been suspicious of her evidence and found the complaint not legally proven."11,5
     The probate of Tobiah Colles of Saybrook, Connecticut, following his death in Aug 1664, mentions "my Corne in Timothy Brooks lot …," one of several indications that Timothy had property interests in the Niantic region of Connecticut.12
     Cutter tells us, "His father-in-law was a prominent Baptist, and Timothy was also interested in the Baptist tenets as held at that day."3
     In the spring of 1667, 22 men, all of Plymouth, purchased of Metacom ("King Philip"), sachem of the Pokanoket band of Wampanoags, all the marsh and meadow land of Mattapoisett. Metacom also conveyed 500 acres of land at the head of Mattapoisett. Meanwhile, Elder John Myles, of Swansea, Wales, had brought a number of his Baptist parishioners with him to New England, and settled in Rehoboth, which had an established Congregational church. The Baptists were prosecuted and each fined five pounds. "Yet in case they shall remove their meeting to some other place where they shall not prejudice any other church," said the court, "and shall give any reasonable satisfaction respecting their teaching, we know not but they may be granted by this court liberty to do so."
     "In accordance with this plain intimation that there would be no objection to the organization of a Baptist church outside the jurisdiction of any other church, the town of Swansea was organized. In March, 1667, at the request of Captain Thomas Willetts, Reverend John Myles, and their neighbors, the general court of New Plymouth passed an order, called the grant of Swansea, authorizing them to form a township to be called by the name of Swansea …" Swansea comprised within its limits the present town of Swansea, with Somerset in Massachusetts and Barrington and the greater part of Warren in Rhode Island. The town was Baptist, and so strong was this affiliation that no other church would be built in Swansea until 1832.13,14
     At a town meeting, 22 Feb 1669, Swansea's proprietors voted that "all persons that are or shall be admitted inhabitants within this town, shall subscribe to the three proposalls above written, to the several conditions and explanations therein expressed, before any lot of land be confirmed to them or any of them." Those three proposals were: (1) That no erroneous person be admitted into the township as an inhabitant or sojourner. (2) That no man of any evill behaviour or contentious person to be admitted. (3) That none may be admitted that may become a charge to the place.15
     Although he now had property interests at Swansea and (probably still) Niantic, Timothy moved, circa 1670, to Billerica, north of Woburn, which also had a Baptist following, and where he remained about 8 years.4,2,16,3
     "In Dec. 1677, George Polly, the wife of John Wilson, Senior, John Wilson, Junior, Timothy Brooks, Francis Wyman, Aaron Cleveland and Hopestill Foster are admonished and sentenced to pay costs of court for 'frequent absenting themselves from the public worship of God on the Lord's days.'—Middlesex County Court Records, Vol. III., page 205 … In Dec. 1677, Capt. John Carter and Maj. William/2 Johnson are allowed ten shillings apiece for attending the courts to give in evidence against the 'Anna baptists.'—Middlesex County Court Records, Vol. III., page 207. Several of these persons were again summoned to court and fined for similar violations of law in 1679."17,18
     At this point, with 12 children, Timothy's gaze turned south, back to Swansea.19 "
     His wife Mary died at Billerica 15 Sep 168020, and Timothy married (2), by the following March, probably at Swansea, Mehitabel/2 Mowry, daughter of Roger/1 Mowry and Mary Johnson, and widow of Eldad Kinsley, one of the organizers of the Baptist Church at Rehoboth. Timothy moved his family to Swansea, where they lived for 10 years or more and where a son Josiah (and perhaps another, Isaac) was born.21,22 9 Mar 1680/81, Timothy Brooks and wife Mehitable, of Swansea, conveyed to Benjamin Mozey (Muzzey), of Rumney Marsh, Boston, real estate in Billerica.23,3 In his father Henry's will dated 18 Jul 1682, Timothy Brooks received one third of his father's wearing apparel and confirmation of all that land I gave him; "he hath [received] his portion already."24,1,25 3 Jun 1685, Timothy Brookes of Swanzey and wife Mehitable convey to Henry Esten 12 acres, her dowry "for & in satisfaction of a certain sum of money which the said Roger Mawrey promised unto the said Eldad Kinsley in marriage with his said daughter Mehittabell for part of her portion."26,27
     Timothy Brooks was commissioned lieutenant of the Swansea company, Bristol County regiment, 1686, and captain, 169028, and was Swansea's deputy to the General Court, 1689.29 He does not appear again in Swansea records. Shortly after 1690 Timothy, his wife Mehitabel, sons Timothy Jr. and Josiah, and perhaps one or two daughters, removed to the vicinity of Salem, West Jersey, probably following "a little band of Welsh Baptists" who had previously moved in 1687. In 1673 Lord Berkley had sold his half of New Jersey to the Quakers, and Quaker tolerance induced Baptists from Massachusetts Bay to settle there. Accompanying Timothy's family were households surnamed Bowen, Barrett and Swinney. According to Robert Peacock Brooks, they landed at the mouth of the Cohansey River, in today's Cumberland County.
     
Some of these people settled along the north side and some on the south side. The Brooks [sic], Bowens, Barrotts and the Swinneys settled along the north side near Bridgetown (Bridgeton) and called their settlement "Bowentown," or the Brooks Company, for the reason that Timothy Brooks, Junior, was their pastor. The region near the home of the Barrotts was known and is still known today [1927] as Barrotts Run ... Many of the descendants of Timothy, Jr. live in the region of Bowentown, and for many years his lineal descendants lived on the farm of his father at that place.

     Lillian Brooks Black writes,

Their destination was a nascent Baptist colony on the western side of the Cohansey River, just upstream from Cohanzick, which soon changed its name to Greenwich. This Cohansey settlement, Roadstown, was founded about five, some say three, years earlier by other Massachusetts Baptists, including a number from Swansea, onetime neighbors of the newcomers. However, the Brookses, Barretts, Bowens, and Swinneys trekked a wee distance inland, northwest of the stream. There they bought land and cleared it for farming. The settlement grew into Bowen's Cross Roads (now Bowentown). A Cohansey tributary traversing Barrett property is still known as Barrett's Run.30,31

     The will of Timothy Brooks, dated 12 Mar 1708/9 and proved 7 Oct 1712 in Salem County, names his wife sole executrix, and leaves her all his goods and chattels save some things previously given to his son Josiah, "which Is His part or porshon from me"; leaves son John all the money that is due to me in New England, and half the land that falleth to me in the township of Swansey; and the other half of his Swansea land to son-in-law Jonathan Kingsley. Son Timothy is left 5s. upon the death of his mother, the rest of the estate to be divided among his daughters, who are not named.32,33

Exhibits.
     More on the establishment and early years of Swansea.14
     Will of Timothey Broockes, as he signed his name. In the spring of 1667, Hugh Cole was one of 22 men, all of Plymouth, who purchased of Metacom.14 Capt. Timothy/2w Brooks was a witness to SWANSEA background text storage from Cole

     "In the spring of 1667 Hugh Cole, Constant Southworth, Josias Winslow, Captain James Cudworth, and seventeen others, all of Plymouth, Mass., purchased of Phillip, the Indian chief, all the marsh and meadow land of Mettapoisett.
     "Phillip conveyed to Hugh Cole, Constant Southworth, Josias Winslow, James Cudworth, and John Coggshall five hundred acres of land, 'Beginning at a great rock close by the path in the middle of the brook named Wegantanquest north one mile west north west to brook to Willets land at the head of Mettapoisett to a creek and by it to the brook.' The river on the east side of Swansea was named Coles River, and is still [1908] known by that name.

BAPTISTS UNDER REV. JOHN MYLES AT REHOBOTH AND SWANSEA
     "'Elder John Myles of Swansea, Wales, rector of the Baptist Church at that place, came to America with a number of his followers. They settled in Rehobeth. A prosecution was brought against Mr. Myles and his followers, and the court fined each of them five pounds, and the court further found that continuance of their meetings was prejudicial to the peace of the church and that town, and that they be not allowed, and all persons concerned therein were ordered to wholly desist from said meeting in that place or township. Yet in case they shall remove their meeting to some other place where they shall not prejudice any other church, and shall give any reasonable satisfaction respecting their teaching, we know not but they may be granted by this court liberty to do so." (Plymouth Colony Records, vol. 4, page 163).
     "In accordance with this plain intimation that there would be no objection to the organization of a Baptist church, outside the jurisdiction of any other church, the town of Swansea was organized.
     "In March, 1667, at the request of Captain Thomas Willetts, Reverend John Myles, and their neighbors, the general court of New Plymouth passed an order, called the grant of Swansea, authorizing them to form a township to be called by the name of Swansea. …
     "Swansea comprised within its limits the present town of Swansea, with Somerset in Massachusetts and Barrington and the greater part of Warren in Rhode Island.

THE TOWN'S ENDURING BAPTIST CHARACTER (references Sampson Mason)
     "'Thomas Willets, noted as an organizer and the first English mayor of New York, is said to have drawn up the articles of agreement under which the town was organized, and gave to Plymouth Colony a town distinctly Baptist for more than one hundred and sixty years. For it was not until 1832, or later, that there was any other organized sect within the town.
     "'James Brown, who was an assistant of the court of Plymouth and a man of considerable learning, Hugh Cole, and others, with those before mentioned, contributed to form a group of remarkable men, whose influence was to extend over many generations, and to have an effect upon the destinies of the nation almost as marked as the character of the men themselves.' (A.H. Mason, Sampson Mason Genealogy.)
     "Throughout the colonies of Plymouth taxation for the church was general, and no person was exempt. But it was the custom of the pastors of the Swansea Church to waive this right and claim support only from those who sat under their teaching. This was the first Baptist Church organized in Massachusetts.
     "Eight years after the organization of Swansea the war with King Phillip, the Indian chief, began, and Swansea was almost depopulated. Most of the homes were burned and scores of its inhabitants slain, and all the others forced to find some other place of refuge.
     "From the fact that John Myles having come from Swansea, Wales, and bringing many of his followers with him, and the Cole family being for many years prominent in the church, it became a tradition of the family that the Cole family were Welch. [sic]
     "Gershom Cole was the first person killed by the Indians in Swansea. Hugh Cole's house mentioned was the first burned by the Indians at the commencement of the war." with Hugh/2 Cole.14

Local Notes:

Property1679, Billerica, MABillerica Tax List 1679 | Michael BACON 1 0. 6. 6 | Tim. BROOKES | 0 [polls] | [taxed] 0. 4. 6 …34
Elected1689, Swansea, MARepresentative29

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S1459] Henry Brooks inventory, 17 Apr 1683.
  2. [S106] NEHGS Register, 29:153–157.
  3. [S298] Cutter & Loring, Brooks Family of Woburn, 6, Timothy (3.) Brooks.
  4. [S41] General Register of the Society of Colonial Wars, 1899–1902, 578, garrison house master. Hereinafter SCW General Register, 1902.
  5. [S1272] "Middlesex County Court Files (1649-1675)," online database at NewEnglandAncestors.org.
  6. [S283] John Langdon Sibley, Graduates of Harvard University, 1:549, Brookes; 1:585, Rev. John Brock.
  7. [S106] NEHGS Register, 29:153–57: 2 Dec 1659.
  8. [S210] Edward P. Johnson, Woburn Records, 3:33, Timothy Brooks/Mary Russell m.
  9. [S221] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages, 103, Timothy Brooks: 2 Dec.
  10. [S2083] George Henry Fox, "Descendants of Isaac Fox," 4.
  11. [S1755] Roger Thompson, Sex in Middlesex, 75, 77, citing Pulsifer 1:267, File 30.
  12. [S944] Carol Pullen-Reynolds, citing Manwaring, Hartford (1635-1700), 1:9.
  13. [S132] Robert Peacock Brooks, Timothy Brooks, 44.
  14. [S1219] Ernest Byron Cole, James Cole of Plymouth, 11-13.
  15. [S945] Jane Devlin, citing Wright, Hist. Swansea, 49 ff.
  16. [S132] Robert Peacock Brooks, Timothy Brooks, 11-13, 42–43.
  17. [S210] Johnson, Woburn Records, 3:55, footnote to Cleveland.
  18. [S522] Samuel Sewall, The History of Woburn, 1:168.
  19. [S1650] Robert Peacock Brooks, "Henry Brooks," 44.
  20. [S300] Vital Records of Billerica, Massachusetts, To the Year 1850, 346, Mary Brookes d.
  21. [S221] Torrey, New England Marriages, 103, Timothy Brooks: 1680.
  22. [S520] Anderson, Sanborn and Sanborn, The Great Migration, 1634–1635, 1:314, Mehitable [Mowry].
  23. [S36] James Savage, A Genealogical Dictionary, 1:263.
  24. [S298] Cutter & Loring, Brooks Family of Woburn, 3-4, Henry (1.) Brooks.
  25. [S2306] Gene Zubrinsky, personal communication, 9 Nov 2017: identification of second witness's signature.
  26. [S298] Cutter & Loring, Brooks Family of Woburn, 7, Timothy (3.) Brooks.
  27. [S520] Anderson et al, The Great Migration, 1634–1635, unpaginated, Roger Mowry, transcription at Ancestry.com.
  28. [S767] Ebenezer W. Peirce, Peirce's Colonial Lists, (1881), page unrecorded.
  29. [S41] SCW General Register, 1902, 578.
  30. [S132] Robert Peacock Brooks, Timothy Brooks, 43–44.
  31. [S141] Black, "After 12 Generations," page unrecorded.
  32. [S216] H. Stanley Craig, New Jersey Colonial Documents, Calendar of Wills, 62, Timothy Brooks.
  33. [S946] Beverly G. McNally, photocopy of will of Timothy Brooks, 12 Mar 1708/9.
  34. [S945] Jane Devlin, citing NEHGR 5:173–74, 1679 Billerica tax list.
  35. [S210] Johnson, Woburn Records, 1:27, Timothy Brooks b.; 2:20, d.
  36. [S210] Johnson, Woburn Records, 1:27, Timothy Brooks b.
  37. [S210] Johnson, Woburn Records, 1:27, John Brooks b.
  38. [S300] Billerica VR, 346, Mary Brooks d.
  39. [S298] Cutter & Loring, Brooks Family of Woburn, 7, Abigail (3.xii.) Brooks.
  40. [S298] Cutter & Loring, Brooks Family of Woburn, 7, Elizabeth (3.xi.) Brooks.
  41. [S300] Billerica VR, 29, Mary Brooks 2d b.; 346, d.
  42. [S300] Billerica VR, 29, Mary Brooks b.
  43. [S300] Billerica VR, 29, Hepzabah Brooks b.
  44. [S300] Billerica VR, 29, Anna Brooks b.
  45. [S300] Billerica VR, 29, Lydia Brooks b.
  46. [S300] Billerica VR, 29, Rebecca Brooks b.
  47. [S1081] Alverdo Hayward Mason, ed., Swansea Records, 24-5, Josiah Brooks b.

Mehitabel/2 Mowry

F, #4192, (say 1644 - )
Father*Roger/1 Mowry1 d. 5 Jan 1666/67
Mother*Mary Johnson1 b. s 1615, d. b 6 Jan 1678/79
Appears on charts:Descendants of Henry/1w Brooks
Descendants of Timothy/2w Brooks
Custom index:Baptists of Early Massachusetts & West Jersey
Last Edited:16 Aug 2017

Children with Eldad Kingsley:

  • Elizabeth Kingsley12 b. 29 Jan 1662/63
  • John Kingsley13 b. 6 May 1665
  • Samuel Kingsley14 b. 1 Jun 1669
  • Jonathan Kingsley15 b. 21 Feb 1671, d. 15 Jun 1750
  • Mercy Kingsley16 b. 7 Oct 1675
  • Nathaniel Kingsley15 b. 5 Feb 1678

Children with Capt. Timothy/2w Brooks:

Mehitabel/2 Mowry was born say 1644, probably at Salem or Lynn, Massachusetts.1 Her father removed to Providence, Rhode Island, where she married (1), 9 May 1662 "or shortly thereafter," Eldad Kingsley of Rehoboth, Massachusetts, son of John Kingsley, with whom she had 6 children.2,1 He died in 1679.3,4
     She married (2), as his 2nd wife, before 9 Mar 1681, probably at Swansea, Massachusetts, Capt. Timothy/2w Brooks, son of Henry/1w Brooks and (–?–) (–?–), and widower of Mary Russell. Timothy moved his preexisting family to Swansea, where the blended household lived for 10 years or more, and where a son Josiah (and perhaps another, Isaac) was born.5,6 Mehitabel was, like both her husbands, a strong Baptist.7
     3 Jun 1685, Timothy Brookes of Swanzey and wife Mehitable convey to Henry Esten 12 acres, her dowry "for & in satisfaction of a certain sum of money which the said Roger Mawrey promised unto the said Eldad Kinsley in marriage with his said daughter Mehittabell for part of her portion."8,1 Sometime around 1690 Timothy, Mehitabel and a number of the children removed to West Jersey Province.9 Mehitabel was sole executrix of Timothy Brooks's will, dated 12 Mar 1708/9, and proved 7 Oct 1712 in Salem County, West Jersey.10,11

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S520] Anderson, Sanborn and Sanborn, The Great Migration, 1634–1635, unpaginated, Roger Mowry, transcription at Ancestry.com.
  2. [S221] Clarence Almon Torrey, New England Marriages, 103, Timothy Brooks.
  3. [S106] NEHGS Register, 29:153–157.
  4. [S132] Robert Peacock Brooks, Timothy Brooks, 43.
  5. [S221] Torrey, New England Marriages, 103, Timothy Brooks: 1680.
  6. [S520] Anderson et al, The Great Migration, 1634–1635, 1:314, Mehitable [Mowry].
  7. [S132] Robert Peacock Brooks, Timothy Brooks, 44.
  8. [S298] Cutter & Loring, Brooks Family of Woburn, 7, Timothy (3.) Brooks.
  9. [S141] Black, "After 12 Generations," 16.
  10. [S216] H. Stanley Craig, New Jersey Colonial Documents, Calendar of Wills, 62, Timothy Brooks.
  11. [S946] Beverly G. McNally, photocopy of will of Timothy Brooks, 12 Mar 1708/9.
  12. [S575] James N. Arnold, Rehoboth VR, 2:661, Elizabeth Kingsley b.
  13. [S575] Arnold, Rehoboth VR, 2:661, John Kingsley b.
  14. [S575] Arnold, Rehoboth VR, 2:661, Samuel Kingsley b.
  15. [S575] Arnold, Rehoboth VR, 2:661, Nathaniell Kingsley b.
  16. [S575] Arnold, Rehoboth VR, 2:661, Mercy Kingsley b.
  17. [S298] Cutter & Loring, Brooks Family of Woburn, 7, Josiah (3.xiii.) Brooks.

Anna/3w Brooks

F, #4193, (23 January 1675/76 - )
Father*Capt. Timothy/2w Brooks1 b. c 1635, d. b 7 Oct 1712
Mother*Mary Russell1 b. c 1634, d. 15 Sep 1680
Appears on charts:Descendants of Henry/1w Brooks
Descendants of Timothy/2w Brooks
Last Edited:29 Jul 2017
Anna/3w Brooks was born 23 Jan 1675/76 at Billerica, Massachusetts.1 She was living with her aunt Sarah Mousall of Woburn, 15 Jun 1702, and was named in her will.2,3 She married (–?–) Wright4, and sister Anna Right is mentioned in the will of her brother John/3w Brooks of Swansea, 9 Apr 1713.5,4

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S300] Vital Records of Billerica, Massachusetts, To the Year 1850, 29, Anna Brooks b.
  2. [S183] Craig Beeman, citing NEHGR, 29:153–57.
  3. [S298] Cutter & Loring, Brooks Family of Woburn, 7, Anna (3.viii.) Brooks.
  4. [S692] H.L. Peter Rounds, Abstracts of Bristol County, 3:212-213, John Brooks.
  5. [S216] H. Stanley Craig, New Jersey Colonial Documents, Calendar of Wills, 62-63, John Brooks.