Samuel/4w Lewis

M, #45221, (16 April 1702 - )
Father*Thomas Lewis1 b. s 1666
Mother*Elizabeth/3w Brooks1 b. s 1669, d. 8 Nov 1731
Appears on charts:Descendants of Henry/1w Brooks
Descendants of Timothy/2w Brooks
Descendants of Elizabeth/3w Brooks
Last Edited:6 Jun 2008
Samuel/4w Lewis was born 16 Apr 1702 at Swansea, Massachusetts.1

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S1081] Alverdo Hayward Mason, ed., Swansea Records, 62-19, Samuell Lewis b.

Experience/4w Lewis

F, #45222, (27 April 1704 - )
Father*Thomas Lewis1 b. s 1666
Mother*Elizabeth/3w Brooks1 b. s 1669, d. 8 Nov 1731
Appears on charts:Descendants of Henry/1w Brooks
Descendants of Timothy/2w Brooks
Descendants of Elizabeth/3w Brooks
Last Edited:6 Jun 2008
Experience/4w Lewis was born 27 Apr 1704 at Swansea, Massachusetts.1

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S1081] Alverdo Hayward Mason, ed., Swansea Records, 10-1, Experienc Lewis b.
Metacom (known to the English as "King" Philip), sachem of the Pokanokets, sent Cole word that "he could not control his young warriers" and that Cole should abandon his house and seek refuge on Aquidneck Island in Narragansett Bay.3

Hugh/2 Cole

M, #45226, (29 June 1628 - 26 January 1699/0)
Father*Capt. James/1 Cole1 b. c 1600, d. a Oct 1678
Mother*Mary Tibbs2 b. s 1602
Custom index:Baptists of Early Massachusetts & West Jersey
Philip's War (1675-76)
Last Edited:6 Aug 2017

Children with Mary/2 Foxwell:

  • Lt. James/3 Cole+18,12 b. 3 Nov 1655 or 8 Nov 1655
  • Hugh/3 Cole+19,20 b. 6 Mar 1658, d. 17 Feb 1738
  • John/3 Cole+19 b. 15 May 1660, d. 25 Jun 1748
  • Martha/3 Cole18,12 b. 14 Apr 1662 or 16 Apr 1662
  • Anna/3 Cole12,18 b. 14 Oct 1664 or 14 Dec 1664, d. 23 Jun 1704
  • Ruth/3 Cole18,12 b. 8 Jan 1666, d. 17 Mar 1718
  • Joseph/3 Cole18,12 b. 15 May 1668 or 18 May 1668
  • Ebenezer/3 Cole18 b. 1671, d. 4 Sep 1719
  • Mercy/3 Cole21 b. say 1673, d. before 7 Jan 1705/6
  • Mary/3 Cole18 b. 1676, d. 10 Mar 1756
  • Dea. Benjamin/3 Cole22 b. 1678, d. 29 Sep 1748
Findagrave.com, memorial #68057988. 2015 stone. Photo by Betty.
Hugh/2 Cole, baptised 29 Jun 1628 at Barnstaple, Devonshire4, went with his family as a boy to New England, where they settled at Plymouth, Massachusetts. There he was on a list of men able to bear arms (between the ages of 16 and 60), 1643.2,5 8 Apr 1645, a committee of Plymouth townsmen agreed with James Cole that his son Hugh should keep the community's cows this year through mid-November, receiving 50 bushels of corn for his pains.6 He married (1), 8 Jan 1654, Mary/2 Foxwell of Barnstable, daughter of Richard/1 Foxwell and Anne Shelley,7 and in 1657 took the oath of fidelity.8 He was on the grand jury in 1666, surveyor the following year8, and witnessed, 29 Jun 1667, the will of Nathaniel Warren, Sr., of Plymouth.8 30 Oct 1667, "The sum of fifty shillings is ordered to be paid Samuel Jackson by Hugh Cole, for taking up his boat which went adrift."8 In 1668 he was appointed administrator of the will of his father-in-law Richard/1 Foxwell, in which he was mentioned.8
     His name is crossed off a voter list at Plymouth, 16 Jun 1668, indicating that he had removed to Swansea, of which he was an incorporator.9
     Not surprisingly, given his residence at Swansea, then the English frontier with the Pokanoket band of the Wampanoag people, Hugh Cole is reported to have had exceptionally close contact and familiarity with his Native neighbors. In Mar 1671, he reported to the court that Indians from across the region were collecting at Mount Hope — a harbinger of the war to come in 1675. Before the outbreak of war, Hugh Cole later said, Metacom (known to the English as "King" Philip), sachem of the Pokanokets, sent Cole word that "he could not control his young warriers" and that Cole should abandon his house and seek refuge on Aquidneck Island in Narragansett Bay.3
     While at Swansea he witnessed the will of Elizabeth Howland of Swansea, 17 Dec 1686, and was an overseer of the will of William Bartrum, 17 Dec 1686.10 He married (2), as her 3rd husband, 1 Jan 1689, Elizabeth/2 Litter, daughter of Thomas/1 Litter, of Plymouth, and widow of William Shurtleff and Joseph/2 Cook (the latter the son of Francis/1 of the Mayflower).11,12 She died at Swansea 31 Oct 1693.11 He married (3), 30 Jan 1693/94 at Plymouth, the widow Mrs. Mary Morton.13
     A shipwright by trade2, Hugh Cole died at Swansea 26 Jan 1699/0 (rec. as Junier), "Aged about 72 or 73."14 He is buried with his 1st wife Mary (who died by 1689) in Tyler Point Cemetery, Barrington, Rhode Island.15

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

     In the spring of 1667, Hugh Cole was one of 22 men, all of Plymouth, who purchased of Metacom all the marsh and meadow land of Mattapoisett. Metacom also conveyed to Hugh Cole, Constant Southworth, Josias Winslow, James Cudworth, and John Coggeshall, 500 acres of land at the head of Mattapoisett. The buyers renamed the river on the east side of what would become Swansea Cole's River.
     Meanwhile, Elder John Myles, of Swansea, Wales, had brought a number of his Baptist parishioners with him to New England, and settled in Rehoboth, which had an established Congregational church. The Baptists were prosecuted and each fined five pounds. "Yet in case they shall remove their meeting to some other place where they shall not prejudice any other church," said the court, "and shall give any reasonable satisfaction respecting their teaching, we know not but they may be granted by this court liberty to do so."

     In accordance with this plain intimation that there would be no objection to the organization of a Baptist church, outside the jurisdiction of any other church, the town of Swansea was organized. In March, 1667, at the request of Captain Thomas Willetts, Reverend John Myles, and their neighbors, the general court of New Plymouth passed an order, called the grant of Swansea, authorizing them to form a township to be called by the name of Swansea … Swansea comprised within its limits the present town of Swansea, with Somerset in Massachusetts and Barrington and the greater part of Warren in Rhode Island.
     Thomas Willets, noted as an organizer and the first English mayor of New York, is said to have drawn up the articles of agreement under which the town was organized, and gave to Plymouth Colony a town distinctly Baptist for more than one hundred and sixty years. For it was not until 1832, or later, that there was any other organized sect within the town.
     James Brown, who was an assistant of the court of Plymouth and a man of considerable learning, Hugh Cole, and others, with those before mentioned, contributed to form a group of remarkable men, whose influence was to extend over many generations, and to have an effect upon the destinies of the nation almost as marked as the character of the men themselves.

     
In 1675, war broke out, initially with the Wampanoags, and Swansea was almost depopulated. Most of the homes were burned, scores of its inhabitants slain, and the others forced to find some other place of refuge. "Gershom Cole was the first person killed by the Indians in Swansea. Hugh Cole's house mentioned was the first burned by the Indians at the commencement of the war."16

Local Notes:

Propertysay 1660, Sakonnet, RI"He sold to his son Hugh of Swansey, shipwright, land at Saconnet [today's Little Compton, Rhode Island] 'granted to the old servants, whereof I am one.2'"
Property27 Oct 1662, Plymouth, MAAt a Towne meeting held by the Townesmen the 27th of October 1662 | The Names of those whoe desire meddow att the lower south meddow: next unto those that have had former grauntes there | James Cole Juni: | hugh Cole | Twenty acres of upland is graunted unto James Cole Juni: lying on the northerly side of his land att Lakenham with all and singulare the appurtenances to him and his heires for ever; [This is since layed out for him * 6 book *] | fifty acres of upland is graunted unto hugh Cole lying betwixt the hither mannomett point and the peece of salt marsh; with all the appurtenances belonging thereunto unto him and his heires for ever;17
Property2 Jul 1667, Plymouth, MAThe Court have granted unto Hugh Cole respecting his father's grant being an ancient freeman, and his own grant six score acres between Mattapoinset River and the eastern bound of Ackshenoh.8
ElectedSwansea, MASelectman in '71, '72, '75, '85, '86.
Deputy to the general court in '73, '74, '75, '80, '81, '83, '84, '85, '86, '89.8

Source Citations/Notes:

  1. [S965] Records of Plymouth Colony, 1:19-20.
  2. [S288] Charles Henry Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts, 110, James Cole.
  3. [S1634] Nathaniel Philbrick, Mayflower, 215, 224.
  4. [S148] Findagrave.com, memorial #68057988.
  5. [S1220] Frank T. Cole, Cole Family in America, 56.
  6. [S1218] Records of the Town of Plymouth, 1:19-20.
  7. [S288] Pope, Pioneers of Massachusetts, 174, Richard Foxwell.
  8. [S1220] F.T. Cole, Cole Family in America, 57.
  9. [S1218] Plymouth Town Records, 1:100-101.
  10. [S1222] The Genealogical Advertiser: III:4 (Dec 1900), 117-18, Abstracts from the First Book of Bristol County Probate Records, will of Elizabeth Howland.
  11. [S1081] Alverdo Hayward Mason, ed., Swansea Records, 145-19, Elizabeth Cole d.
  12. [S1220] F.T. Cole, Cole Family in America, 59.
  13. [S1222] The Genealogical Advertiser, I:1 (Mar 1898), 1, Plymouth County Marriages.
  14. [S1081] Mason, Swansea Records, 149-4, Hugh Cole Junier d.
  15. [S148] Findagrave.com, memorials #68057988, #68058156.
  16. [S1219] Ernest Byron Cole, James Cole of Plymouth, 11-13.
  17. [S1218] Plymouth Town Records, 1:48-49, 51.
  18. [S1219] E.B. Cole, James Cole of Plymouth, 27.
  19. [S1219] E.B. Cole, James Cole of Plymouth, 27, 33.
  20. [S1220] F.T. Cole, Cole Family in America, 59, 61.
  21. [S486] Debbye Lansing, citing H.L. Rounds, Abstracts of Bristol County Probate, 2:149, estate of Mercy Cole.
  22. [S1219] E.B. Cole, James Cole of Plymouth, 27, 35-36.